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DIOR AND HIS DECORATORS: VICTOR GRANDPIERRE, GEORGES GEFFROY, AND THE NEW LOOK

I’m rather excited to share the latest and greatest tome by my exquisite friend, Maureen Footer! Dior And His Decorators: Victor Grandpierre, Georges Geffroy, and the New Look is a celebration of Dior, Victor Grandpierre, and Georges Geffroy and their enduring contribution to the definition of chic. I’ve been forever fascinated by Dior and the work of Geffroy, but I have to admit I only had slight knowledge of Grandpierre – it’s a great joy to learn more!

Christian Dior from “Dior And His Decorators: Victor Grandpierre, Georges Geffroy, and the New Look”

The author Maureen Footer, a historian and an expert in French decorative arts, had the entire Dior archive at her disposal – which, as you might expect, helped her to create a uniques and engaging narrative replete with (195!) captivating images. Her work deftly brings to light many lesser known aspects of these three legendary taste makers. With chapters devoted to each, one is given a most glorious glimpse into post WWII France and how, from the cultural rubble, their careers were formed, and the “new look” was made manifest.

Georges Geffroy from “Dior And His Decorators: Victor Grandpierre, Georges Geffroy, and the New Look”

The story of Geffroy really resonated with me. When he finally started to make some real money he acquired a modest apartment at the fabulous 248 Rue de Rivoli – a fifth floor walk up with Mansard roof. Footer writes: “Geffroy turned architectural defects into virtues….The result was the mix of elegance, measure and surprise that characterizes Geffroy’s best work.” As an aside: I myself have recently paid homage to Geffroy, utilizing octagonal panels for our beloved Scott McBee’s NYC maisonette!

Grandpierre is a most captivating figure as well, and is really responsible for helping to “brand” Dior via his designs for Dior’s first couture house at 30 Avenue Montaigne with its chic, elegantly restrained look: pale gray walls, white moldings, and Louis XVI style chairs. Grandpierre also created the template for the now famous Dior typeface, logo, and ensuing signage and packaging which, like all good design, has stood the test of time – a look that appears as fresh and relevant today as it must have then.

From “Dior And His Decorators: Victor Grandpierre, Georges Geffroy, and the New Look”

From “Dior And His Decorators: Victor Grandpierre, Georges Geffroy, and the New Look”

From “Dior And His Decorators: Victor Grandpierre, Georges Geffroy, and the New Look”

Dior was a successful art dealer before he became a fashion designer. Geffroy and Grandpierre also pursued many different career paths along the way, but ultimately their paths merged and all three excelled, becoming iconic Parisian designers who Footer writes: “…captured the moment and often predicted the future.”

Footer’s tome is so very good – I actually read it cover to cover in only two sittings – it was nearly impossible to put down!

Do get a copy of Dior And His Decorators: Victor Grandpierre, Georges Geffroy, and the New Look for yourself and for your friends as well!

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