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HOMAGE TO CDR. WHITEHEAD AND SLIM AARONS

James Andrew, Lyford - after Slim Aarons' Cmdr. Whitehead at Lyford.

James Andrew, Lyford – after Slim Aarons’ Cmdr. Whitehead at Lyford.

For an artist who most enjoyed “…photographing attractive people doing attractive things in attractive places,” it’s no wonder that Slim Aarons found himself quite at home in Lyford. From its inception the Lyford Cay Club sought to attract the rich. the interesting, and the beautiful as members — and unlike many clubs in places like Palm Beach, Lyford welcomed all sorts without the dogmatic discrimination and antisemitism that pervaded so many social clubs of the day.

A long time Lyford member, Commander Edward Whitehead has to be the original mold for the “most interesting man in the world.” A former British Royal Navy officer and head of Schweppes USA, Commander Whitehead became the face of Schweppes, with the now classic ad campaign portraying the Englishman delivering highbrow discourse on the beverage’s “Schweppervescence.” He also wrote a treatise How to Live the Good Life: The Commander Tells You How based on words he delivered aboard the Cunard liner, QE2. My friends who knew him at Lyford tell me he was a delightful, dashing, and debonaire man. Needless to say he is a man after my own heart. I’m sure he would have had a blog if he were with us today!

Commander Whitehead by Slim Aarons

Commander Whitehead by Slim Aarons

For today’s post, I’m paying homage to Commander Whitehead and his brilliant portrait by Slim Aarons. I’m dressed in a Tom Ford era Gucci navy cotton pique jacket, Tom Ford pale blue shirt with contrast white collar and cuffs and white cotton twill pants, Ralph Lauren silk and linen pink, ivory and pale blue stripe tie, pink silk pocket square by Charvet, pearl and pale blue sapphire cuff links, red and blue bi-color braided belt with silver buckle by Adriano Meneghetti, navy suede Gucci loafers, Rolex, and my fragrance is Creed Original Cologne.

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DIA:BEACON AND A WEEKEND AT WYNKOOP

James Andrew at DIA:Beacon

James Andrew at DIA:Beacon


James Andrew at DIA:Beacon (detail)

James Andrew at DIA:Beacon (detail)


Summer always finds me anxious to get out of town for a bit of rejuvinative green and nature. Thankfully I’ve been blessed with quite a few weekend invites to some of the most lovely places this summer. This weekend was no exeption as it brought a gorgeous getaway invitation to my super chic friend’s Hudson Valley country home, Wynkoop (more about this in our next post).

En route to Wynkoop House we decided to rendezvous at the Carl Andre Exhibition at DIA:Beacon —- it’s just a quick scenic train ride from the city that affords some glorious views of the Hudson River along the way. If you don’t know, DIA:Beacon is housed in a former Nabisco box printing factory with 300,000 square feet of the most perfect exhibition space illuminated by a spectacular 34,000 square feet of skylight—a perfect space to enjoy the equally spectacular installation of grand scale Serra sculptures there.

Serra at DIA:Beacon

Serra at DIA:Beacon

The beauty of the place extends beyond the confines of the building into Robert Irwin’s gardens, where I stopped for a photo amidst ravishing rows of hornbeam hedge. For our art expedition, I’m sporting a Tom Ford era Gucci white linen jacket, Michael Bastian for Gant chartreuse cotton safari shirt, chartreuse silk pocket square from Charvet Paris, Tom Ford era Gucci olive python belt with silver double horse head buckle, white cotton shorts by Mario Matteo,Tom Ford woven olive suede espadrilles, a vintage Rolex and my fragrance is Creed Bois de Cedrat.

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A TRANSITIONAL TREILLAGE

James Andrew - Katherine Hepburn Garden

James Andrew – Katherine Hepburn Garden

I totally have a thing for treillage – I just cannot get enough of it! Emerging in the 12th century as a mostly utilitarian latticework for gardners to support climbing vines, it wasn’t until the 17th century when Louis XIV hired Le Notre to design the gardens at Versailles that the art of treillage really reached outrageous heights. For a good read on the subject see here.

Katherine Hepburn Garden

Katherine Hepburn Garden

Whether I’m designing an interior treillage (in the round or as a classic print) to give the feeling of a garden pavilion, or I’m in the garden creating fantasies and follies, I am of course beyond elated whenever I can employ treillage. In fact, I currently have clients with a fabulous outdoor space that has sadly been a bit neglected, and I’ve been looking to design an element for them that can be enjoyed from both interior and exterior perspectives. The environment is a bit modern, so the design has to be somewhat minimal – a transitional work that can bridge both classic and modern aesthetics. While pondering this, a serendipitous walk home through the Katherine Hepburn Garden (located in Dag Hammarskjöld Plaza) has provided me with just the inspiration I need. It’s a marvelous stretch that pays homage to Hepburn for her work with the Turtle Bay Association (which she had been active in since 50s), and it is replete with a fabulous series of follies and a splendid demilune colonnade. I think it has just the right balance of old and new for my client’s aesthetic!

Taking time to study this tremendous use of treillage, I’m sporting a Tom Ford era Gucci black linen denim jacket, Michael Kors off white cotton knit top with crocheted placket, Ralph Lauren Denim & Supply black paisley print linen canvas shorts, KJP woven white cotton belt, Tom Ford black and white silk pocket square and “Marco” sunglasses, vintage Rolex, Louboutin black leather sandal espadrilles, Tom Ford Bronzing Gel for a bit of a sun kissed glow, and my fragrance is a mix of Tom Ford Wood Oud and Oud Fleur.

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