WHAT IS JAMES WEARING? Rotating Header Image

ROARK MODERN A VENUE TO INSPIRE

James at Roark Modern - Photo:  Boris Glamocanin

James at Roark Modern – Photo: Boris Glamocanin

With the look and feel of a glamorous uber chic Tribeca loft, Roark Modern is certainly one of my favorite destinations for antique furniture. This indispensable resource is the brainchild of Lisa Bowles who began her career as an interior designer. She’s always sought out-of-the-way places — the back streets of Paris, remote villages in Southern France, Spain, Italy, etc. — to bring her clients the most unusual and rarely seen furniture and objects. Fortunately for all of us, Bowles brings this same approach to her ravishing showroom, sharing a masterful mix of styles and periods selected with natural flair and a deep knowledge of all things antique.

Roark Modern

Roark Modern

Here the super stylish Bowles is constantly arranging and re-arranging, creating what she likes to call moments — vignettes and interesting juxtapositions of periods and styles inviting one to look at things with fresh eyes. Of course these ravishing vignettes never last very long because the pieces are always quickly snapped up by some of the most influential designers and taste makers around! That being said, do make a point to visit Roark Modern often – there will always be something new to delight and inspire!

Roark Modern

Roark Modern

Photographed at Roark Modern (top) by photographer Boris Glamocanin, I’m sporting a Tom Ford “Wetherby” suit in ocean blue wool silk linen melange, royal and white cotton silk polka dot print french cuff shirt, Seaman Schepps pearl and pale blue sapphire cuff links, Charvet navy and royal retro print silk pocket square, vintage Rolex, Pierre Hardy cobalt suede demi boots, my fragrance is Tom Ford Madorino Di Amalfi and Tom Ford Bronzing Gel for a bit of a sun kissed glow.

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THE FRICK SAVED

James Andrew, The Frick.

James Andrew, The Frick.

In a letter from the Frick’s director Ian Wardropper, we’ve receive the best news we could possibly hope for:

After months of public dialogue and thoughtful consideration and weighing the potential for a protracted appoval process against the Frick’s pressing needs, the Board of Trustees has decided to approach the expansion plan in a way that avoids building on the garden site.

In short, our beloved Russell Page garden at the Frick has been saved! Turns out our votes counted and our voices were heard — it shows that collectively we can indeed make a difference!

The Frick Garden by Kate Schelter

The Frick Garden by Kate Schelter

The Frick Garden by Jonathan Myles Lea

The Frick Garden by Jonathan Myles Lea

There are so many who should be thanked for their tireless efforts, ideas, support, and resources — Marina Rust, Kate Schelter, Kate Belin, Jonathan Myles-Lea, Madison Cox, Annette de la Renta, Giancarlo Giammetti, Peter Pennoyer, Robert A.M. Stern, fellow bloggers like Heather Clawson, etc. etc. Rachel Feinstein who was instrumental in mobilizing artists to create a group letter, the Historic Districts Council, Friends of the Upper East Side Historic Districts, Defenders of the Historic Upper East Side, the expertise and leadership of the Cultural Landscape Foundation as well as the Garden Club of America, and of course everyone at Unite to Save the Frick — all of whose collective efforts have been critical in persuading the powers that be to preserve this glorious bit of hallowed ground.

The Frick Garden by Annika Connor

The Frick Garden by Annika Connor

Celebrating the saving of the Russell Page garden at the Frick, I’m decked out in my “flowers not towers” Tom Ford floral silk/cotton pants (a special thank you to Jeffrey Sternfeld for finding these beauties for me), lavender silk wook jacket, white cotton shirt with French cuffs and a royal dot print silk pocket square, Seaman Schepps pearl and pale blue sapphire cuff links, vintage Rolex, Hadliegh royal blue gingham tasseled slippers, Creed Pure White Cologne and a bit of a sun kissed glow via Tom Ford Bronzing Gel.

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YEW TREE HOUSE ANTIQUES

James Andrew at Yew Tree House Antiques

James Andrew at Yew Tree House Antiques


During my years with Albert Hadley, I loved shopping with him to find interesting things for his clients. As you might imagine, that time under his mentorship has had such a major influence on my own aesthetic. The wildly eclectic Hadley was drawn to pieces with personality, and he always managed to find the most sublime things wherever he was. He did have his favorite haunts, though. Take for instance, Yew Tree House Antiques — located slightly off the beaten track at 414 East 71st Street here in town, they’re known for their assortment of “Antiques of Character.” One is always guaranteed a sensational surprise – there you’ll find the unusual, the witty, and the superb.

I approach design as a couturier would, creating highly personal environments for my clients. My mission has always been to delight the senses, and to create the perfect backdrop for the good-life. Needless to say, I’m hugely reliant on shops like Yew Tree House Antiques to realize this mission. I recently found a fabulous English Arts and Crafts fender seat for a client and stopped by Yew Tree House Antiques to see what other treasures they might have — I was quite taken with the remarkable collection of 52 carved miro wood fish (top) made as souvenirs from Pitcairn Island. I can easily envision these displayed on a massive wall in a client of mine’s Montauk home.

Suitably attired for a warm Spring day, I’m sporting a Tom Ford palest pink silk suit, brown and pale pink floral print cotton shirt, brown and ivory silk glen plaid pocket square, brown leather belt with rose gold buckle and brown suede tasseled loafers, vintage Rolex, and my fragrance is Creed Acqua Originale – Vetiver and Geranium https://www.creedboutique.com/creed-acqua-originale-collection/203-vetiver-geranium.html